heel pain Sheffield Rotherham Doncaster Worksop

Heel Pain

About heel pain

The plantar fascia is a band of tough tissue that runs from your heel, along your foot and connects to the metatarsal bones in the ball of your foot. This tissue acts as a shock absorber for when you walk. When the plantar fascia becomes inflamed, it causes pain in the heel of your foot and is called plantar fasciitis. We can treat heel pain in Sheffield, Rotherham, Doncaster and Worksop.

Plantar fasciitis is more common in people aged 40 to 60 and in people who are overweight or obese. But you may also get it if you are on your feet all day, especially on a hard surface or if you have inadequate shoes. Plantar fasciitis is also a common runner’s injury.

What are the symptoms of heel pain?

The main symptom of plantar fasciitis is pain in the heel of your foot. The pain might be described as:

  • Worse when you first stand up or start walking, especially if you’ve been asleep or sitting down for a long time.
  • Coming on after being on your feet for a long period including walking, standing or running.
  • Possibly sharp at first but lessens as you move around.

What treatments are available?

Plantar fasciitis usually clears up on its own although this can take 12 to 18 months. Most treatments can help reduce this recovery time, but resting your foot is the best treatment:

  • Comfortable and supportive shoes – to cushion the heel when walking or standing.
  • Ice therapy – to reduce swelling and inflammation.
  • Orthotics – insoles that cushion the heel and/or support the foot arch.
  • Physiotherapy – for strengthening and stretching exercises.
  • Splints – wearing a splint at night can help with plantar fasciitis recovery.

Surgery isn’t a common option for treating plantar fasciitis but an operation to relieve the tension on the plantar fascia can be performed. Book your treatment for heel pain in Sheffield, Rotherham, Doncaster and Worksop. You can also follow us on social media. 

 

Book Treatment

Latest Tweets

@PaulCaden1 I have just had a quote of £160 to change a radiator. The radiator is extra which costs £120. New valves £20. The £160 includes pipe alterations. The old sizes do not match the new ones so pipes often need shortening etc. that’s the tricky part for DIY.

Last month from Coriel Orthopaedic Group 💙's Twitter via Twitter for iPhone