We can treat Knee Arthritis in Sheffield, Rotherham, Doncaster and Worksop. 

Knee Arthritis

About Knee Arthritis

Arthritis is inflammation of one or more of your joints. Pain, swelling, and stiffness are the primary symptoms of arthritis. Any joint in the body may be affected by the disease, but it is particularly common in the knee. We can treat Knee Arthritis in Sheffield, Rotherham, Doncaster and Worksop.

Knee arthritis can make it hard to do many everyday activities, such as walking or climbing stairs. It is a major cause of lost work time and a serious disability for many people. The major types of arthritis that affect the knee are osteoarthritis, rheumatoid arthritis, and posttraumatic arthritis.

Osteoarthritis

Osteoarthritis is the most common form of arthritis in the knee. It is a degenerative,”wear-and-tear” type of arthritis that occurs most often in people 50 years of age and older, but may occur in younger people, too.
In osteoarthritis, the cartilage in the knee joint gradually wears away. As the cartilage wears away, it becomes frayed and rough, and the protective space between the bones decreases. This can result in bone rubbing on bone, and produce painful bone spurs. Osteoarthritis develops slowly and the pain it causes worsens over time.

Rheumatoid Arthritis

Rheumatoid arthritis is a chronic disease that attacks multiple joints throughout the body, including the knee joint. It is symmetrical, meaning that it usually affects the same joint on both sides of the body.
In rheumatoid arthritis the synovial membrane that covers the knee joint begins to swell, This results in knee pain and stiffness.
Rheumatoid arthritis is an autoimmune disease. This means that the immune system attacks its own tissues. The immune system damages normal tissue (such as cartilage and ligaments) and softens the bone.

Posttraumatic Arthritis

Posttraumatic arthritis is form of arthritis that develops after an injury to the knee. For example, a broken bone may damage the joint surface and lead to arthritis years after the injury. Meniscal tears and ligament injuries can cause instability and additional wear on the knee joint, which over time can result in arthritis.

What are the symptoms of a knee arthritis?

Knee arthritis is painful and will probably affect your ability to walk. Other symptoms include:

  • The joint may become stiff and swollen, making it difficult to bend and straighten the knee.
  • Pain and swelling may be worse in the morning, or after sitting or resting.
  • Vigorous activity may cause pain to flare up
  • Loose fragments of cartilage and other tissue can interfere with the smooth motion of joints. The knee may “lock” or “stick” during movement. It may creak, click, snap or make a grinding noise (crepitus).
  • Pain may cause a feeling of weakness or buckling in the knee.
  • Many people with arthritis note increased joint pain with rainy weather.

What treatments are available?

There is no cure for arthritis but there are a number of treatments that may help relieve the pain and disability it can cause.

Non Surgical treatment

  • Lifestyle modifications – Some changes in your daily life can protect your knee joint and slow the progress of arthritis.
  • Physical therapy – Specific exercises can help increase range of motion and flexibility, as well as help strengthen the muscles in your leg. Your doctor or a physical therapist can help develop an individualized exercise program that meets your needs and lifestyle.
  • Assistive devices – Using devices such as a cane, wearing shock-absorbing shoes or inserts, or wearing a brace or knee sleeve can be helpful.
  • Medications. Several types of drugs are useful in treating arthritis of the knee.

Surgical Treatment

Your doctor may recommend surgery if your pain from arthritis causes disability and is not relieved with nonsurgical treatment. As with all surgeries, there are some risks and possible complications with different knee procedures. Your doctor will discuss the possible complications with you before your operation.

  • Arthroscopy – During arthroscopy, doctors use small incisions and thin instruments to diagnose and treat joint problems.
  • Cartilage grafting – Normal, healthy cartilage tissue may be taken from another part of the knee or from a tissue bank to fill a hole in the articular cartilage. This procedure is typically considered only for younger patients who have small areas of cartilage damage.
  • Synovectomy – The joint lining damaged by rheumatoid arthritis is removed to reduce pain and swelling.
  • Osteotomy – In a knee osteotomy, either the tibia (shinbone) or femur (thighbone) is cut and then reshaped to relieve pressure on the knee joint. Knee osteotomy is used when you have early-stage osteoarthritis that has damaged just one side of the knee joint.
  • Total or partial knee replacement (arthroplasty) – Your doctor will remove the damaged cartilage and bone, and then position new metal or plastic joint surfaces to restore the function of your knee.

Book an appointment for knee arthritis in Sheffield, Rotherham, Doncaster or Worksop today. You can also follow us on social media.

 

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